Thursday, September 03, 2009

Japanese voters may have commited economic harakiri

If you haven't noticed, Taro Aso of the center-right LDP (Liberal Democratic Party of Japan), the most recent prime minister of Japan, was politically killed by the recent polls.

He was a kind of character - and an openly pro-market, pro-separation-of-classes guy. That was too much of a good thing for the low-profile, emotionally conservative electorate in the world's #2 economy which is only the #13 source of the TRF visitors. They ended the 50 years of the government led by LDP.



Kimi ga Yo, or "May Your Reign Last Forever", turned out to be too optimistic anthem lyrics for LDP of Japan.

What is it going to mean for Japan? The winner is the left-wing DPJ (Democratic Party of Japan). Yukio Hatoyama is nicknamed "The ET" or "The Alien" because he looks like one. Moreover, his wife had a trip aboard a UFO space shuttle to Venus, a beautiful planet governed by the little green party (which allowed a 400 °C of CO2 greenhouse effect: the little green comrades picked Venus as the destination because they apparently don't have good mental asylums in Japan).

Yukio Hatoyama comes from the "Japanese Kennedy family" and is going to become the next prime minister of Japan in two weeks.

Their program includes a schedule to screw the Japanese relationships with the United States and a sophisticated strategy to harass the Japanese corporations. The ET has been attacking the existing Japanese market economy which he calls the "unrestrained market fundamentalism and financial capitalism that are void of morals" for quite some time.

He also wants to "put the interests of people before those of corporate Japan", a formulation that will be familiar to those who remember the communist coup d'états in the former socialist Europe, apparently not noticing that the whole Japanese post-war miracle was about the freedom of the corporations to stay ahead of the average citizen and to drag him or her to the future, which has always been in his or her best interest.



Will the Japanese workers be motivated enough by their corporations to work hard enough to afford Beethoven's fifth breakfast? And will Honda's Rube Goldberg machine satisfy the CO2 limits described in the next paragraph?

Moreover, he wants to reduce Japan's CO2 production by 25% by 2020 which approximately translates into a minus 2% annual GDP growth rate for every year in the following decade. It shouldn't shock you that the Japanese companies are concerned, to put it very mildly.

We will see whether the ET is able to transform Japan ($34,000 GDP per capita) into another Vietnam ($2,100 GDP per capita) or North Korea ($1,700 GDP per capita), much like many of his soulmates have repeatedly done in other countries. The Vietnamese people are doing fine in the Czech Republic, we kind of like them, and we're obviously ready to absorb thousands of Japanese emigrants, too. ;-)

No comments:

Post a Comment