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Spain abolishes subsidies for new renewable energy sources

Benny Peiser has pointed out the following good news coming from Bloomberg:

Spain Suspends Subsidies for New Renewable Energy Power Plants
Spain is finally doing something about its fiscal sustainability. The state-backed borrowings that funded ludicrous (i.e. "renewable") sources of energy have reached €24 billion. That's something like 1/15 of the Greek public debt or, equivalently, 1/15 of an infinity. ;-)

This impressive Spanish solar power plant uses molten salt to store energy overnight.

Spain is currently controlled by the People's Party, a conservative party, and Mariano Rajoy Brey is the prime minister. Fortunately for Spain, the years of socialist comrade Mr José Luis Rodríguez Zaplaťpéro (whose last name translates as "Pay for the spring, pen, and pri*k" from Czech: you see that their government has paid for lots of useless things) are over.

The projects that have already been funded are unfortunately unaffected (that includes some of the rumored Spanish solar plants that were said to be producing energy at night: those rumors could have been exaggerated); the policy only influences projects that could have been planned for the future.

The decision follows an announcement by Germany that Europe's largest economy would abandon subsidies for ludicrous sources of energy by 2017. I don't have the newest data but here are the solar megawatt data from the end of July 2010. The solar superpowers were:
  1. Germany: 9,785 MW
  2. Spain: 3,386 MW
  3. Japan: 2,633 MW
  4. USA: 1,650 MW
  5. Italy: 1,167 MW
  6. Czechia: 465 MW
  7. Belgium: 363 MW
  8. China: 305 MW
  9. France: 272 MW
  10. India: 120 MW
Most of the numbers have surely dramatically increased in the recent 18 months. I wrote Czechia in bold face to show you a strikingly crazy example of my homeland. Even though Al Gore and James Hansen were constantly licking the anal openings of the Chinese communist apparatchiks and their five-year plans, China actually had fewer installed solar megawatts than Czechia whose population is smaller by a factor exceeding 100! The subsidies offered in Czechia – which isn't too sunny – were immense and exceeded those in Germany. That's why Czechia's "solar megawatts per GDP ratio" exceeded other countries by orders of magnitude.

At any rate, the decisions affecting solar energy in Germany and Spain are the most important ones, as the table above clarifies. Czechia may be a good role model for countries that start to fight with the tumors composed of renewable subsidies. This insanity grew out of control in 2010 or so when it jumped by an order of magnitude in just one year.

However, politicians have realized that they have truly neglected something that could grow to a fiscal catastrophe and they've been trying to undo their sins. Unlike Germany and Spain, Czechia has introduced a 26% tax against solar profits which also applies "retroactively" to ludicrous sources of energy that have already been built. This extra "tax for renewable pirates" has been paid since the beginning of 2011. The legal format of these payments – ordered by the government, not the Parliament – was optimized so that the possible lawsuits become as difficult and unlikely as possible and so far, it really looks like things are working pretty well.

The solar and wind pirates who were dreaming about insane and totally undeserved profits may only try to sue Czechia because it didn't protect their investment.

However, the Czech policies should be largely immune against some insane EU-wide laws that try to insert their arrogant fingers into individual EU countries. Shamefully enough, the non-democratic EU bureaucracy is full of pretentious environmentalist people who have still not been transferred and recycled to the dumping ground where they belong so one must be extremely careful about various judicial ways how the EU-wide unelected communist kleptocracy could try to screw the countries whose governments have already and finally understood that the renewable propaganda is a giant pile of s*it, if you really insist that I must be totally polite while speaking about those as*holes.

See a Wikipedia page with more numbers about the renewable energy sources in EU countries. Czechia almost matches Germany in PV per capita; after a huge gap, Spain, Belgium, and Italy follow.

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snail feedback (1) :

reader Jirka said...

Lubos, you meant to say fountain pen/di#k. But I am affraid that spanish/czech word play might be too much for englksh speakers.