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Death Valley: highest temperature on Earth will survive 100th anniversary

Tons of journalists were recently hyping the warm weather that came to California and other places. Fox News and many others talk about "tied records" and "baked West".



But the real story which is almost totally overlooked is the comparison of the absolute temperature record on Earth and the modest temperatures in recent years that had no chance to match it. This real story is clearly inconvenient to the climate alarmists, one of the most unhinged and dishonest cliques of demagogues who have ever walked on the face of Earth, and journalists many of whom have always been trying to claim that what is happening right now is amazing even if it is not.




The Wikipedia page on weather records tells us, among other things, the highest ever recorded temperature in each country, on each continent, and on the whole Earth. For example, the absolute Czech record is just 40.4 °C – near 105 °F - recorded last August in the West suburbs of Prague. Czechia is one of a half-dozen of countries only that display a record from 2012 or 2013.

However, the global record happens to be recorded in the Death Valley, California – a place in the Mojave desert that is close to the borders of Nevada. On July 10th, 1913 – which will be exactly 100 years ago next Wednesday – the thermometers showed 56.7 °C – that is 134 °F. One may check a weather forecast for that place to see that during the following week, the temperature over there will drop by 5 °C or so.

Because the Death Valley only saw 129 °F during the recent 2013 heat wave, that means that the 1913 world record will have survived for more than 100 years.




Note that the current "extreme" temperatures were still 5 °F cooler than the record temperature set in 1913. This difference is four times greater than the oft quoted temperature increase during the 20th century. If we exaggerate by another factor of four, we may say that relatively to 1913, the year 2013 represents an ice age in the Death Valley.

We're often manipulated into thinking about the warmest ever recorded year according to the global mean temperature. The years such as 1998 and 2005 – relatively recent years most of us remember – win this contest. However, the globe wasn't covered by reliable weather stations just a century ago. On the other hand, individual thermometers have been doing a good job for several centuries. Despite their small number in the past, we may find some really hot readings.

I think that the absolute highest temperature ever recorded on Earth by a thermometer is at least as interesting an extremum as the year with the highest global mean temperature. It's the ultimate Olympic discipline. In spite of this fact, we almost never hear – and talk – about such a thing. Why? Because the 1913 record is just another inconvenient truth, just another fact that challenges the bold assertion that the recent years and decades are unusually warm.

Because most of the people who are spreading and interpreting the weather records these days are biased corrupt jerks who are humiliating proper science, despising the scientitic integrity, and spitting into your face, we are bombarded by selected pieces of information that are meant to convey the misguided picture that there is something unusual going on with the climate these days.

I wonder: How many of you have known that 1998 or 2005 boasts the "warmest year on the Earth" title? And on the contrary, how many of you knew that the absolute temperature record was recorded in the Death Valley in 1913? Concerning the latter quiz question, I will even tolerate the (obsolete) opinion (TRF) that the warmest temperature ever, 58 °C or 136.4 °C, was recorded in Al Aziziyah, Libya on September 13, 1922 – because this alternative changes nothing about the big picture.

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reader lemiere said...

note that those places are not urbanized, what to think about other records when conditions of measure has changed?


reader Smoking Frog said...

On some day in the 19th century, maybe in 1859(?), the temperature supposedly was 135 F. for a few hours. I think the National Weather Service says they can't vouch for that, but they support 130 F.


As you know. Santa Barbara is on the coast - on the waterfront - so 130 or 135 would seem to be complete nonsense, but they say it was due to a severe Santa Ana condition. In the afternoon, the temperature went from the 70s to 135, stayed that way for a few hours, and returned to the 70s in the evening.


The people thought it was the end of the world. They gathered in a building with very thick walls, and they prayed. Birds fell out of the sky - not per se incredible - it's been seen many times in the lower desert in California - but it's part of the story. And a man was found dead on the beach.


reader papertiger0 said...

All day I've faced a barren waste,
Without the taste of water.
Cool water.

Old Dan and I, with throats burned dry,
And souls that cry for water.
Cool, clear, water

Keep a-movin, Dan, don'tcha listen to him, Dan
He's a devil, not a man
and he spreads the burning sand with water.

Dan, can ya see that big, green tree?
Where the water's runnin' free
And it's waitin' there for you and me?

The nights are cool, and I'm a fool.
Each star's a pool of water.
Cool water.

But with the dawn, I'll wake and yawn,
And carry on to water.
Cool, clear, water.

Keep a-movin, Dan, don'tcha listen to him, Dan
He's a devil, not a man
and he spreads the burning sand with water.

Dan, can ya see that big, green tree?
Where the water's runnin' free
And it's waitin' there for you and me?
Cool, clear, water

Cool, clear, water


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E8ewWSMNoHI



Commentary on current conditions, and greeting from sunny California!


reader Honza said...

You have typo in last paragraph "58 °C or 136.4 °C".


reader papertiger0 said...

Talk about smoking frogs. Wow. That's hot.


reader HenryBowman419 said...

Actually, the conditions in Death Valley are radically different from a Santa Ana condition, as extremely hot temps in Death Valley arise when a very stable high-pressure system is over the (very low) valley, whereas Santa Barbara's high temps during Santa Ana conditions arise from high, hot winds.


reader Duster said...

Minor nit pick. "Mojava" is a request for more coffee. The desert is the Mojave.


reader oi812 said...

we started recording temp when we were coming out of the mini ice age no wonder the records keep falling


reader Smoking Frog said...

I realize they're different, but I don't see that they're "radically different," and actually I think you're wrong about the Santa Ana condition. They both result from air flowing downhill and being compressed in the process (adiabatic heating), but the higher land elevations are farther away in the case of the Santa Ana condition than they are in Death Valley. In Death Valley, their being nearby and on all sides makes the valley like a convection oven. Check these out:

Santa Ana winds

Death Valley


reader Smoking Frog said...

The Santa Barbara event occurred on June 17, 1859. The Carrington Event began on August 28 the same year. I wonder if that's just a coincidence.


reader Smoking Frog said...

Hotter than the real Smoking Frog, no doubt. (4th century Mayan warlord.)


reader papertiger0 said...

But it's a dry heat. You work out in it, sweat never drips off your brow. It sublimates off direct to the atmosphere, leaving behind a rind of salt on your clothes where perspiration would normally collect.


I sort of liked it actually. In a normal environment with humidity I sweat buckets.
So it was neater for me.


reader Scott Scarborough said...

I have heard of all the records you mentioned. Including the one that was rescinded in 2012. So you think record high temps are a better indicator of global warming than attempted average temperature measurements over the whole surface of the earth? I think that there might be some truth to that. In fact the first thing I independently looked at when trying to decide if there was anything to this global warming claim was to look at the United State's (that's where I live) all time record high and low temperatures for each of the 50 states. I averaged the DATES of the highest temperatures achieved in each of the 50 states and I did the same for the DATES of the lowest temperatures ever achieved in each of the 50 states. The average date of the lowest temperatures was about 3 years and 3 months more recent than the average dates of the highest 50 temperatures. On its face, that seems impossible to me unless Global warming is incorrect. I'm an engineer not a statistician but that was enough to convince me. Is there any statistical validity to such a procedure?


reader Smoking Frog said...

But it's a dry heat. You work out in it, sweat never drips off your brow. ...

I sort of liked it actually. In a normal environment with humidity I sweat buckets.
So it was neater for me.




The only thing I said which could make that "But ..." relevant is that the people were miserable at 130-135, so maybe you're telling me that one could work out at such temperatures. Unless you mean a very brief workout, that's absurd. Cattle were dropping dead while standing in the shade of oak trees.



Or maybe the temperatures you "sort of liked" and thought you could work out in were in the 110-125 degree range. That's not absurd, but it's foolish.



I suspect your "kind of liked" is about temperatures in which you merely stood around for a while. I know the feeling. The highest outdoor temp I know I've experienced is 115. The highest I suspect I've experienced is 120 or a little higher. Sure, they feel OK for a while - kind of pleasant - but you'd feel a whole lot different if you tried to work out.


reader Smoking Frog said...

"Mojava" is a request for more coffee. The desert is the Mojave.


Nonsense. "Mojava" is the present subjunctive of "mojave." ;-)


reader papertiger0 said...

Naw. I use to live there in the Mojave. Ridgecrest, Indian Wells Valley, China Lake.


And by working out, I mean working out in the wind. The great outdoors.
Hauling the wood. Mowing lawns. Digging the ditch. Swapping engines on a tractor. Earning the daily bread.


Not Jane Fonda work out.


But it's a dry heat. Specially in Death Valley. Was it a 120? 130? don't know. I didn't carry around a thermometer and a ferver to see warmists eat crow back then.


I know it was hot. Damn hot.


But it was a dry heat. I prefer my heat to be crispy rather than sopping.