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11-year-old quantum physicist enters a Texas college

Mr Carson Huey-You is a 11 years old boy who plays the piano and speaks Mandarin fluently. On 9/11/2001, the 75-pound, 4-foot-7 boy who finds calculus relaxing (basketball is OK, too) wasn't born yet but he wants to become a quantum physicist.



And as Fox News, TCU 360, Statesman, and others reveal, he just made a non-trivial step in order to become a quantum physicist.

He was just accepted to the Texas Christian University as a freshman physics major.




This surely sounds like a part of the CV of his fellow Texan Dr Sheldon Cooper, it's cool, so congratulations! ;-) My understanding is that his mother is black while his father is Chinese.

Of course, I don't know how hard the process of admission was and whether this story is more than just a media stunt by the university. But it surely does sound neat and convincing, especially because we're told that he got 1770 on his SAT which isn't bad. He's been reading approximately since his 2nd birthday. He knew the five basic mathematical operations – addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and the Feynman path integral – a year later.




When I was 11, I was just barely starting to understand special relativity, having had almost no exposure to quantum physics or even the term "quantum physics".

At any rate, 11 years is a wonderful age to start with quantum physics. I would guess that it's low enough age so that if you start to learn related physics insights at this age, you are more likely to avoid Bohmian, Everettian, GRWian, material collapsian, and other delusions denying some fundamental and universal postulates of quantum mechanics.



At the age of 15-16, he wants to get a PhD and become a visiting professor. Because of this comment, I must remind the U.S. readers that the 7th season of The Big Bang Theory will begin next month, on 9/26.

Good luck!

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reader Shannon said...

It's unfair.


reader Luboš Motl said...

Why?


reader Shannon said...

Because he can and I can't. Nature is unfair.


reader Luboš Motl said...

Yes, you can! ;-)


reader Dilaton said...

Cool kid, I wish him all the best and a lot of fun with his studies too :-)


reader Dilaton said...

Come on Shannon ... ;-)!


reader Shannon said...

Thanks guys you are so sweet ;-). I'll keep trying forever.


reader John said...

With those scores he'd barely qualify for a gifted & talented summer program on the East Coast, so I assume this says more about his parents or their perception of the education available in their local high schools. A Texan commenter may have more insight.

(Reminder for older folks: his 1770/2400 on current SATs is 1200 under the previous system.)


reader AJ said...

Apparently, newborns lose their ability to understand quantum mechanics at about 3 months age:

http://www.livescience.com/33973-newborn-babies-quantum-mechanics.html/


reader Soylent Green said...

Fox must like those stories, Lubos. Here's one from 2009 about an 11-year-old college GRADUATE...

http://www.foxnews.com/story/2009/06/05/11-year-old-graduates-college-with-degree-in-astrophysics/


reader RAF III said...

I learned about the new system when my son took the test 2 years ago. In addition to the multiple choice questions in English and Mathematics , which constituted the entirety of the test when I took it (ignoring other AP tests), there is an additional essay section which is scored subjectively. Given the total scores only I don't see any rational way to compare them.


reader Dimension10 (Abhimanyu PS) said...

"Addition, subtraction, multiplication, dfivision andm the Feynman Path Integral"...'


Hahahahaahahahaahhahahaahaha


Feynman Path integrals At 11?


What was I learning then? Calculus? .


reader Ann said...

Good luck to him -- he has a great smile, open and enthusiastic.

OT: an interesting video (about 4 and a half minutes) on camouflage ability of cephalopods -- the little critters have some amazing skills of their own.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HhjqxJTfI_Q


reader Shannon said...

Wow! This is amazing (Even better camouflaged than in the movie The Predator).


reader Peter F. said...

Lumo's peekaboo experiences must have been lacklustre when he was very little. ;-)


reader Pierre said...

Well.. pretty much ever month for the last 50 years we've been hearing about these genius kids, who can do this and this at the age of XY but in the end nothing really great comes off of them. Their skills are just way above the skills of their peers which probably points to the brain maturing much sooner in some special ways. Once his peers grow up they'll catch up on many levels to him.



So sure yeah, it's cute they can tackle problems most adults can't but it seems they're missing the special "mojo" (a special kind of creativity) to be the one to solve a really hard problem or at least find a very interesting question.


reader Eugene S said...

Dear Ann, did you know that you're the most popular commenter on The Reference Frame? It's true, you have the highest ratio of upvotes to comments. Conclusion: you should post to TRF more often!


reader Smoking Frog said...

With those scores he'd barely qualify for a gifted & talented summer program on the East Coast, ...


Gifted & talented summer program for whom? I'd be surprised to learn that more than an occasional, rare kid much younger than 16 takes the SAT.

(Reminder for older folks: his 1770/2400 on current SATs is 1200 under the previous system.)


DId you get that simply by proportions, or did you get it from some evidence or different reasoning? By proportions it's 1180, so maybe you're just approximating that. Back in the early 1960s I got 1440 (720 verbal, 720 math) (as well as 769 in the Advanced Math Achievement), but I doubt I could have become a physicist other than a low-grade one or possibly the kind that Lubos ridicules. :-) So the question seems to be how much it should count that this kid is only 11 years old.


reader Smoking Frog said...

In the United States, (East Asian husband,black wife) is the least frequent interracial marriage type. Maybe there's some heretofore unknown special thing about it. Scientists should investigate this! :-) Maybe we could produce a large number of geniuses! :-)


reader Luboš Motl said...

LOL, maybe, I have some doubts about it. Linearity seems a lot of sense and the average IQ of East Asians and blacks is close to the average IQ of whites. ;-)


reader Ann said...

Glad you enjoyed it, Shannon!


reader Ann said...

Gee thanks for letting me know, that is truly surprising. I do think it is because of my low posting numbers, though. I read TRF almost every day - it's hard to think of things to contribute back, though, amid all the super smart regulars who hang out here! Still, I much prefer being a small fish in a big fascinating pond, than a big fish in a tiny boring one. ;-)


reader ahmed said...

When I was nine , I was programming and I was very interested in atomic and quantum physics and mathematics (especially set theory and analysis ). I read a college calculus and a college chemistry book when I was 11 and 12 .Unfortunately , the sources were scarce given that I was living in a third world country and all of my peers were interested in other things . I made a mistake that I choose another career path in an unfortunate moment . I became a medcal doctor .


reader kim said...

its not really true nothing comes of it. look at profesor tao or edward witten. such brilliant scientist.


reader Smoking Frog said...

I agree that linearity seems to make a lot of sense, but that doesn't matter if someone can make money from my idea. :-)



I'm not sure if the following makes less sense or more sense: My stepson has offered that this kid might become the first genius in history with "a penis bigger than his IQ."


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