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Xindl X, Mirka Miškechová: Female stranger in your country

By Mr Xindl X (sings in Czech) and Ms Mirka Miškechová (sings in Slovak)
The Velvet Divorce remains a popular theme in the Czecho-Slovak bilingual songs



CZ: As recently as yesterday, we were speaking the same language.
CZ: Despite the several foreign words, your letters
CZ: seemed readable to me.
CZ: Today those foreign ones dominate [over] the familiar ones,
CZ: what happened with us? Hell?
CZ: What happened with us?




SK: As recently as yesterday, we spoke the same way,
SK: up to small deviations,
SK: I feel like a moron today.
SK: Because all the words sound foreign to me,
SK: what is going on with us? Shit?
SK: What is going on with us?




CZ: Yesterday, I managed to understand you.
CZ: I can still understand the individual words.

SK: However, the meaning of the sentences is eluding you,
SK: you have to try it again and again.

CZ: I am looking into the dictionary
CZ: and I am trying to chase away the bad dream
CZ: that I was your world yesterday.
CZ: And today, I am no longer one.

SK: I am looking into the dictionary and I feel sad
SK: that now I am only a female stranger in your country.

CZ: As recently as yesterday, we were speaking the same language
CZ: but our shared vocabulary is thinning out.
CZ: My sharp sense of humor is losing its cutting edge and it is only cutting now
CZ: and it is irreversibly tearing, tearing, tearing the dialogues'
CZ: thread.

SK: As recently as yesterday, we spoke the same way,
SK: but the words are changing their meanings
SK: and every ship will become its wreckage.
SK: The known ones are becoming unknown
SK: and what is the main (head) problem: we are confusing the gun barrels (headers)
SK: especially (headily) with the heads.

CZ: Yesterday, you were telling witticisms to me
CZ: And today, you are learning the alphabet.

SK: I am also waiting what you will sweat out
SK: be with me but don't ever wake me up again!

CZ: I am looking into the dictionary
CZ: and I am trying to chase away the bad dream
CZ: that I was your world yesterday.
CZ: And today, I am no longer one.

SK: I am looking into the dictionary and I feel sad
SK: that now I am only a female stranger in your country.

SK: As recently as yesterday, we could chat without problems.
SK: Now we best understand one another
SK: when we're quiet.
SK: The words like to hold us off
SK: and in between the lines,
SK: I haven't been able to succeed for quite some time.

CZ: As recently as yesterday, we spoke the same language,
CZ: but in the secluded places of the sentences, we're awaited
CZ: by dangers.
CZ: Words that are as insidious as venomous snakes
CZ: who, in crooked complex compound sentences,
CZ: will undoubtedly betray us.

SK: We have a blind map in front of us,
SK: maybe we aren't trying hard enough.

CZ: It turns out that I still understand your body language.

SK: Although only when I am naked.

CZ: I am looking into the dictionary
CZ: and I am trying to chase away the bad dream
CZ: that I was your world yesterday.
CZ: And today, I am no longer one.

SK: I am looking into the dictionary and I feel sad
SK: that now I am only a female stranger in your country.

CZ: That now you are only a female stranger in my country.

SK: That now I am only a female stranger in your country.



Mr Petr Hapka (CZ) and Ms Jana Kirschner (SK), "The soil will be light upon me" (or whatever is the idiom), is another example of Czecho-Slovak duets whose lyrics is very, touchingly sad. Both musicians were singing in Czech. It was a song that I would sing with my Slovak ex-GF often. The soil has been light upon Mr Hapka since November 2014.

The pairing Czech-male and Slovak-female is pretty much canonical. Even during the federal state, it was much more likely for the male TV host to be Czech and his female colleague to be Slovak. This rhymes with the idea that Slovaks are a "younger nation" so they are mainly supposed to supply younger babes. ;-)



You may find exceptions, too. In this 2011 Czecho-Slovak duet, Ms Lucie Bílá is a top Czech singer (and older!) while Noname is a Slovak male band. In the song, the Slovak guy is marrying Czech women in several mostly well-paid occupations, including the Czech airlines. After a visit to the dentist office, he married her, too. They have two kids now – with teeth like from Germany. ;-)

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