Monday, April 10, 2006

Harper under pressure: scrap Kyoto

While many other politicians experienced pressure from the activists, Stephen Harper, the prime minister of Canada, is under pressure from

who urge him to scrap the "pointless" Kyoto protocol. See the full letter and signatories here. They explain that "global climate change" is an emerging science and the Kyoto treaty would not have been negotiated in the 1990s if the parties knew what we know today. The cliche "climate change is real" is a meaningless phrase used by the activists to fool the public into believing that a climate catastrophe is looming. Climate is changing all the time because of natural reasons and the human impact still can't be disentangled from the natural noise.

Meanwhile, Rona Ambrose has reviewed the situation and concluded that the targets can't be met by Canada: it's impossible. The Canadian economy is recently doing very well which is of course very bad for similar anti-growth policies: the emissions are growing while they should be shrinking according to the protocol.

I think that Canada itself should also honestly admit that if we will hypothetically face warming, Canada will benefit from it. The goal should be to isolate the countries that are supposed to be the "losers" of the hypothetical warming and help them. And also help those countries that face problems that are unrelated to warming which is far more often the case. ;-)

But help them not with the crazy egalitarian policies according to which the whole planet must be heated up or cooled down simultaneously, but help them by rational, focused, meaningful projects. The U.N. should allow Canada to change what its contributions will be and the whole U.N. framework for climate change should be re-built on new principles.

See also: Kyoto hopes vanish.

Rona Ambrose now intends to challenge the international focus on setting emission targets. I am sure she has enough intelligence and charm to do important things. Incidentally, the last link explains some proposed biomass projects that could actually make at least some sense but even these things should be studied and planned rationally.

Prof. Bob Carter, a paleoclimate geologist, explains in the London Telegraph that the main problem with the global warming is that it stopped in 1998. Meanwhile, Al Gore has admitted that the global warming is no longer a scientific or political issue: it is a moral or a religious issue, if you will, and Al Gore is a prophet.



Figure 1: The picture from the Boston Globe shows what the alarmists consider a "balanced journalism" and fair reporting about the climate.

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